Image of Purple Flower
Image of Purple Flower
Image of Purple Flower
Image of Purple Flower
Image of Purple Flower
Zoo Baby Bios

Learn more about our youngest animals here at Tampa's Lowry Park Zoo.

African Penguins
Photo of the African Penguin chick. Photo of the African Penguin chick. Photo of the African Penguin chick.

In wild colonies, penguins are thought to mate for life. Likewise, at the Zoo, African penguins usually remain with a single partner for years. "Tapanga," hatched May 8, 2013, is the third successful hatchling for parents "Thumbelina" and "Flannigan" who have been paired for several years. As with the previous chicks, the newest offspring transitioned to zookeeper care to facilitate independence and to learn to swim, before ultimately joining the colony. “Tapanga” can be seen on exhibit with the colony and aside from her darker plumage, she can also be identified by a red band on her left wing. Tapanga just turned a year old, and is little miss popular. She enjoys chasing bugs, and the occasional guest on the other side of the glass. She is VERY talkative, and likes everyone to know she is around!

The Zoo welcomed another African penguin chick in 2013. The chick, named "Aurora," hatched August 26, 2013 to third time parents “Amber ” and “Violet ” who have been paired for several years. Their first chicks, clutch mates “Asani” and “Aza,” are part of the Zoo’s rookery of more than a dozen penguins. Once on exhibit, the chick will be easy to spot with its dark gray juvenile plumage which will be replaced by the characteristic black and white feathers following its first molt. Aurora turns 1 in August! Her favorite activity is chasing “shiny” things such as mirror reflections. Aurora may be a little petite, but she definitely stands out in the colony and makes herself known.

The newest unnamed African penguin chick hatched June 2, 2014 to fourth time parents “Thumbelina” and “Flannigan” who have been paired for several years. The newest offspring will transition from care by its parents to zookeeper care to facilitate independence and to learn to swim, before ultimately joining the colony. Once on exhibit, the chick will be easy to spot with its dark gray juvenile plumage which will be replaced by the characteristic black and white feathers following its first molt.